How To Make Your Corporate Outing A Dream Come True

You’ve spent the business year with your coworkers, giving it your all. You run an office where you care about your employees, and teamwork is more than a buzz word. You want real personal investment from your coworkers and staff. It’s time to set up a corporate outing.

We’re right there with you, but, before you make your reservations and send out the emails, it might be best to think it through. There’s a sweet spot between a raffle for a $10 gift card and base jumping in lower Manhattan. When it comes to landing the right corporate outing, people can sometimes struggle. We’ve taken the time and heard the stories of people’s corporate outings gone wrong and we’ve put together some tips on how to avoid them.

Survivor Man

There are a number of online stories of corporate outings that involve adventurous activities like canyoning, kayaking, and even camping. As the staff of a ski resort, we can appreciate the thrill of pushing your boundaries. The problem is that your entire staff probably isn’t up for a day’s worth of adrenaline or braving the elements.

My boss was organizing an event for an offsite, and he decided that we should go canyoning. He knew that a colleague and I were afraid of heights (me) and small enclosed spaces (her ) … The event began with a 165-foot drop … We gritted our teeth and did that part, only to realize the next stages were worse. It was a half-day event. There was hyperventilating and actual tears.

Group kayak sessions
Protip: A little excitement is great for a corporate outing, but you don’t want to go overboard. If you’re engaging in physical activity with your staff, make sure it’s structured, safe, and accessible.

The Horse Whisperer

Communication in the workplace is such a critical part of running a smooth machine. From navigating any task that requires collaboration to resolving conflicts in the work place, effective communication is the foundation upon which it all rests. With that in mind, what better way to work on your communication skills than to take up literal horse whispering?

This is an actual corporate leadership activity. On the surface, it may sound like a benign new-age approach to office culture, but there’s always an amount of unpredictability when you bring 1,000-pound live animals into the equation. One traumatized worker writes of the experience:

One of the horses got over-excited, galloped towards the center of the barn where we were being briefed, and nearly trampled one of my co-workers. It was a bonding experience to a certain extent, but only because we all thought we were going to die.

Summer games for corporate events
Pro Tip: Structure your team-building exercise around people, specifically the ones you work with, not barnyard animals (unless they work in sales).

Lost at Sea

Setting yourself apart in the business world takes courage and innovation. You sail into the waters of the open marketplace and navigate your crew through unpredictable waters. This is a metaphor. It’s meant to stay a metaphor. Don’t take your staff on a boating cruise.

I really dislike the team building activities that take place on a boat. I’ve been a part of two such activities in the Seattle area, and both were incredibly painful. The managers got drunk and hit on the few women who would have had to jump overboard to avoid them.”

ProTip: Avoid activities that can trigger common phobias or physical reactions (sea sickness) and structure your events in a way that affords your staff some space if they need it. Also, don’t get drunk and hit on your coworkers.

Team-building activities are great, as long as everyone can come away from the experience with a smile. That is the Wachusett difference, we help you plan activities and create a setting where all of your employees can have a stimulating, fun, positive experience and no one is left out. We are ready when you are, let’s start planning your corporate event. For more details on Festival hospitality package options, email sales@wachusett.com or call us today 978-464-3175.

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